Magazine

Since the 1960s, artist-run centres have enabled artists to work in an autonomous yet collective way. The newly established Lacey Prize aims to recognize these creative art spaces.
Opening in Munich, the "Canada and Impressionism" exhibition gives a new perspective on Canadian artists embracing this international art phenomenon and creating their own individual responses.
J.E.H. MacDonald's seven trips to the Rocky Mountains proved a major source of inspiration. His 1928 painting exemplifies his fascination with the landscape of Yoho National Park.
In her paintings, Prudence Heward depicted women, whom she portrayed as self-contained, even defiant, and whose gazes often directly met that of the viewer.
Created as a tribute to Canada’s centennial, Joyce Wieland's "Confedspread" of 1967 was her first use of quilting to convey the patchwork complexity of Canada.
Over six decades, photographer Dave Heath made several radical changes in artistic direction, but wherever he ventured, there was always a lens of some sort, a poetic and aesthetic brilliance.
A newly acquired work by Brenda Draney reveals her story telling and illustrates the way she invites the viewer to complete the narrative.
Vancouver sculptor Liz Magor replicates familiar every-day objects to reflect, with wry humour, on their meaning in a new context and in different realities.
The fancy ball events in late 19th-century Canada represented the great social gatherings of the country's rich and famous and attendees had the opportunity to commemorate their presence through portraits.