Jean-Baptiste Lallemand

View of the Colosseum, Rome

c. 1747-1764
The Amphitheatrum Flavium, known since the Middle Ages simply as the Colosseum, was begun early in Vespasian's reign (69-79), dedicated by Titus (of the Flavio family, from which it derived its name) in 80, and completed by Domitian shortly thereafter. Built to entertain the people of Rome with prolonged grisly spectacles, its last performance took place in 404, after which the emperor Honorius banned gladiatorial combat. In 1744 Pope Benedict XIV consecrated the arena to the Christians martyred there, effectively putting an end to its other use as a source of marble for builders of Roman monuments. In this drawing, Jean-Baptiste Lallemand, a French resident of Rome for twenty years, depicts the Colosseum from a spot in front of the Arch of Constantine.
Title
View of the Colosseum, Rome
Date
c. 1747-1764
Medium
Drawing
Materials
pen and brown ink with brown, grey, and blue wash over traces of black chalk on laid paper, laid down on laid paper
Dimensions
15.5 x 27.4 cm
Nationality
French
Credit line
Purchased 1963
Accession number
15009