Giovanni (after Titian) Britto

St. Jerome in the Wilderness

c. 1530
Passavant VI, 235, 58 A woodcutter of German origin and training, Johannes Breit was drawn to the thriving book publishing industry in Venice as a producer of illustrations, Italianizing his name to Giovanni Britto. At the time, Venice had a significant German community. His printmaking activities ranged from book illustration, to French siege plans of Boulogne-sur-mer to reproductions after original drawings. For twenty years, he was closely associated with Titian and is recognized as a gifted interpreter of the artist's pastoral subjects. Inspired by the love of nature found in Virgil's "Eclogues" and the contemporary poetry of Jacopo Sannazaro, Titian played a role in establishing the Venetian pastoral tradition in the visual arts in which devotional and mythological subjects were set in expansive landscapes of studied naturalism.
Title
St. Jerome in the Wilderness
Date
c. 1530
Medium
Print
Materials
woodcut on ivory laid paper
Dimensions
39 x 53.8 cm
Nationality
Italian
Credit line
Gift of Philip R.L. Somerville, Toronto, 2010
Accession number
43275