Richard Long

A Straight Hundred Mile Walk on the Canadian Prairie

1974
Richard Long's earthworks are subtle. He makes geometric formations (straight lines, circles, squares, and spirals) with materials found on site (such as rocks, pebbles, wood, and grass), and either replaces them after he has completed and photographed the work, or leaves them to erode back into the landscape. Long combines his art with solitary walking, thus continuing - like his contemporary Hamish Fulton - the British landscape tradition and love of walking: "A journey is a meandering line. To walk straight up and down many times to make a dusty line makes a sculpture ... sculptures are stopping places along a journey. They are where the walk meets the place.... A walk is a line of footsteps. A sculpture is a line of stones. They are interchangeable, they are complementary. I have made walking into sculpture." Long's walks and earthworks generate indoor artworks that include photographs, maps, and/or text, such as in the present example.
Artist
Title
A Straight Hundred Mile Walk on the Canadian Prairie
Date
1974
Medium
Photograph
Materials
gelatin silver print with text in graphite on cardboard
Dimensions
50.6 x 75.9 cm
Nationality
British
Credit line
Purchased 1976
Accession number
18655