Teachers Lesson Plans

Prints and Drawings in Contemporary Inuit Art

Crest
Crest
Definition: Designates ? among other things - a tuft of feathers on top of the head of certain birds.

Detail of The Owl by Kenojuak Ashevak
© West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative Ltd.

Inuktitut
Inuktitut
Definition: Mother tongue of about 18,500 Inuit. It is the language spoken by the majority of Nunavut?s inhabitants.

A selection of a few Inuktitut characters

Metamorphosis
Metamorphosis
Definition: Transformation, change of a form into another.

Nunavik
Nunavik
Definition: Nunavik is the province of Quebec's arctic region. A vast territory lying north of the 55th parallel; bordered by Hudson Bay to the west, Hudson Strait to the north and Ungava Bay and Labrador to the east.

Map Courtesy of Makivik Corporation. Nunavik Research Center.

Ptarmigan
Ptarmigan
Definition: The ptarmigan resemble a grouse. This northern bird is well suited to its environment, e.g. nostrils are hidden by feathers, body feathers have a long, downy aftershaft that increases insulation, and toes are feathered. Ptarmigan have a snow-white winter plumage. Summer plumage is mottled brown.

Canadian Wildlife Service
Reproduced with permission of the Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada, 2003

Qaggiq
Qaggiq
Definition: Inuktitut word: a large dome-shaped snowhouse where meetings or group celebrations are held.

Igloo, Fullerton, N.W.T.
Moodie, J.D. / National Archives of Canada / C-001827

Qamutiik
Qamutiik
Definition: Inuktitut word: a sled with two runners. This word is the plural of qamuti (a runner).

Sepulchre
Sepulchre
Definition: A tomb or burial place.

Umiak
Umiak
Definition: The Inuit term umiak is an open boat, with a wooden frame with a covering of bearded seal or walrus hide. Although comparatively light, it could transport up to thirty people and several tonnes of goods.

Model umiak
Anonymous
Western Arctic
Inuit: Inuvialuit
1905-1915, 20th century
Sealkin, wood, sinew, cotton thread
14.7 x 13.8 x 73.6 cm
Gift of Mrs. LeMans
ME933.2
© McCord Museum