Teachers Lesson Plans

Lord Dalhousie and the Arts

Grade K-3

My own tree:
After showing students the landscapes in the Lord Dalhousie Lesson Plan, especially the work by Charles Forrest, Exact Resemblance of the foliage of the Wood in Canada in October-November, ask them to find a favourite tree in their neighbourhood and to bring in a leaf from this tree. Students will then make their own special tree.

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Grade K-3

My first print:
A master painter, printmaker, goldsmith, as well as art theorist, and humanist scholar, Albrecht Dürer embodied the idea of the renaissance man; constantly seeking, learning, teaching and adding to his vast repetoir of knowledge in both the arts and sciences. In this lesson, students will develop stories using artworks as the foundation for their stories, they will learn about printmaking and then create an artwork using a simple printing technique.

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Grade 4-6

Putting aerial perspective into practice:

Part of the basic training given to the military cadets at the Woolwich Military Academy in England consisted of copying from drawings. This exercise taught the cadets the effect of light and shade and helped them to become acquainted with aerial perspective. The procedure was as follows: first, the principle components of the drawing were lightly sketched in lead pencil. Pen and ink were then used to outline the forms. Light shades of watercolour were then added to set off the drawing. The whole composition was built around a central vanishing point, with figures added to give life to the architectural structures. The final work provided the students with a composition grid that could be applied to a new site.

After showing the students the landscapes in the Lord Dalhousie Lesson Plan, they will study aerial perspective and follow the training methods that were used at the Military Academy in Woolwich to create a landscape.

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Grade 7-8

The ideal trophy:
In 1787 Laurent Amiot, after studying in Paris, returned to Québec City, the centre of silver production in Canada after the British conquest of 1759-60. He introduced to the Canadian market the newly popular Louis XVI style and its neoclassical characteristics of elegant shapes and limited decoration. Smooth surfaces were sometimes engraved with gentle designs.

After showing the students the Taylor Cup, an example of presentation silver in the Lord Dalhousie Lesson Plan, they will create a trophy for their Club or favourite team using the principles of classical design such as proportion and balance.

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Grade 9-12

Panoramic landscapes:
Part of the basic training given at the Military Academy in Woolwich consisted of copying drawings. This exercise taught the cadets the effect of light and shade and helped them to understand aerial perspective. The procedure was as follows: the principle components of the drawing were lightly sketched in lead pencil. Pen and ink was then used to outline the shapes, and then light shades of watercolour were used to set off the drawing. The composition was built around a central vanishing point, with figures added to give life to the image. The exercise provided the students with a compositional grid that could then be applied to a new site.

After showing the students the landscapes in the Lord Dalhousie Lesson Plan, especially the work by James Pattison Cockburn, The Cone of Montmorency, as It Appeared in 1829, they will manipulate and organize elements and principles of design to create a panoramic landscape.

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